Navigation Icon
Login Icon
Phone Icon
Mail Icon


Triangle
Please tap to call: 020 8769 3294 Triangle
info@btg-secondary.lambeth.sch.uk Triangle
 
 

More Able, Gifted & Talented in Geography

The Geography department at Bishop Thomas Grant School uses the QCA’s guide to identifying More Able, Gifted and Talented students within our subject.  Below are the likely characteristics of students who are More Able, Gifted and Talented in Geography:

  • They understand concepts clearly and can apply this understanding to new situations in order to make interpretations.
  • They develop hypotheses, reach conclusions and explore solutions.  They understand geographical ideas and theories, and apply them to real situations.
  • They communicate effectively using both the written and spoken word.  They communicate knowledge, ideas and understanding in ways that are appropriate to the task and audience (for example, writing formal letters and reports, producing brochures representing particular groups).
  • They learn subject-specific vocabulary, use it accurately and are able to define words.
  • They reason, argue and think logically, showing an ability to manipulate abstract symbols and recognise patterns and sequences.  They use and apply mathematical principles (such as area, shape, spatial distribution) and formulae (such as Spearman's rank correlation coefficient) to solve geographical tasks and problems.
  • They identify their own geographical questions and establish sequences of investigation.
  • They understand, and are able to explain, complex processes and interrelationships (for example, within and between physical and human environments).
  • They enjoy using graphs, charts, maps, diagrams and other visual methods to present information.  They transform relief shown by contour lines into three-dimensional models in their minds.
  • They are competent and confident in using the wide range of visual resources required in geography, such as aerial photographs, satellite images, maps of different types and scales, GIS systems and so on.
  • They are confident and contribute effectively when taking part in less formal teaching situations.  They take part readily in role-play situations or simulations and enjoy contributing to outdoor fieldwork.
  • They relate well to other people, showing an ability to lead, manage and influence others, appreciating and understanding others' views, attitudes and feelings.
  • They are willing to share their knowledge and understanding, and steer discussion.
  • They have a more highly developed value system than most pupils of their age.  They have well-considered opinions on issues such as the environment and the inequalities of life in different places.
  • They have a wide-ranging general knowledge about the world.  They have good knowledge of where places are in the world and of topical issues.
  • They are able to transfer knowledge from one subject to another.  They transfer their knowledge of physics, for example, to understanding climate.  Or they transfer knowledge of the industrial revolution from history to help explain the location of industry in the UK.
  • They are able to be creative and original in their thinking, frequently going beyond the obvious solution to a problem.  For example, if faced with the problem of storm pipes being unable to cope with sudden storm surges in an area, they might suggest taking measures like afforestation to reduce storm surges, rather than proposing technical improvements to the pipe system.  If faced with the problem of congested roads, they might suggest taxing cars more heavily, improving public transport or changing land use patterns, rather than building bigger roads.

 

KS3 Provision for MAG&T Students

In conjunction with the school-wide Aspire programme, students have the opportunity to attend subject-relevant lectures after school on Fridays; in the past these have included lectures relating to geological sciences, climate change, tectonics, and hazard management.

Also through the Aspire programme, a number of students are involved in the Model United Nations (MUN).  MUN is run by the NCCA (National Collegiate Conference Association), a non-profit organisation that advances understanding of the United Nations and contemporary international issues.  The MUN positively affects the lives of participants and prepares them to be better global citizens through quality educational experiences that emphasise collaboration and cooperative resolution of conflict.  Prior to the main conference students attend preparation days to educate them on the important global issues that will be discussed.  The selected students thoroughly enjoy the opportunity to debate against their peers from other schools and to discuss issues the current leaders of today are faced with trying to solve. 

Students are invited to enter the Royal Geographical Society’s Young Geographer of the Year competition, which takes place every autumn.  Each year a different question is posed, for which students in Year 7-9 are asked to produce an annotated map or diagram.  The competition is run internally at Bishop Thomas Grant School in the first instance, identifying the best entries from each year group.  These are then submitted to the national competition.  Students entering the competition are judged on the following criteria: their ability to describe and explain the differences between at least two settings; their ability to accurately use scale and symbols in any diagrams used; their ability to use a range of visual data sources; and their ability to describe the types of data sets compared (i.e. say whether they are social, environmental, political).

 

KS4 Provision for MAG&T Students

Students are encouraged to read subject specific publications, such as the GCSE Geography magazine ‘Wider World’, as well as borrow textbooks and films from the department.  The department has a wealth of available resources to help students expand their knowledge and understanding of the world around them.

In conjunction with the school-wide Aspire programme, students have the opportunity to attend subject-relevant lectures after school on Fridays; in the past these have included lectures relating to geological sciences, climate change, tectonics, and hazard management. 

Also through the Aspire programme, a number of students are involved in the Model United Nations (MUN).  MUN is run by the NCCA (National Collegiate Conference Association), a non-profit organisation that advances understanding of the United Nations and contemporary international issues.  The MUN positively affects the lives of participants and prepares them to be better global citizens through quality educational experiences that emphasise collaboration and cooperative resolution of conflict.  Prior to the main conference students attend preparation days to educate them on the important global issues that will be discussed.  The selected students thoroughly enjoy the opportunity to debate against their peers from other schools and to discuss issues the current leaders of today are faced with trying to solve.

Students are invited to enter the Royal Geographical Society’s Young Geographer of the Year competition, which takes place every autumn.  Each year a different question is posed, for which students at KS4 are asked to produce an annotated map or diagram.  The competition is run internally at Bishop Thomas Grant School in the first instance, identifying the best entries from each year group.  These are then submitted to the national competition.  Students entering the competition are judged on the following criteria: their ability to describe and explain the differences between a number of different geographical settings; their ability to accurately use scale and symbols in any diagrams used; their ability to use a range of visual data sources; and their ability to describe the types of data sets compared (i.e. say whether they are social, environmental, political); and the ability to evaluate the importance of different data sets – their strengths and limitations.

Students are invited to take part in the Bronze Duke of Edinburgh Award in Year 9 and 10.  The award is comprised of different sections that must be completed for varying lengths of time, between three and six months.  The sections are: volunteering, a physical activity, and learning a new skill.  The award also requires students to complete a two day expedition where they must plan and walk a route using their map skills, carry all of the equipment they need and camp overnight.  The expedition is a fantastic opportunity for students to become experts in map skills and navigation whilst experiencing an unfamiliar environment and developing their ability to work in teams.  This opportunity is open to all students, not just More Able, Gifted and Talented students, but it may be something that MAG&T students are keen to get involved with as it develops a number of transferable skills, such as problem-solving and communication skills.  More information about the award can be found at www.dofe.org

 

KS5 Provision for MAG&T Students

The Geography department has connections with many establishments such as Royal Holloway University, King’s College London University, the Geographical Association, the Royal Geographical Society and the Geological Society, all of whom provide lectures, conferences and resources suitable for A-Level students.  We aim to ensure that students attend as many lectures and events as possible to develop their understanding of the topics studied and to further their interest in the subject.  Every year the Geography Department ensures that students wishing to carry on their studies after A-Level have the opportunity to experience at least one university taster day.

The department subscribes to all of the relevant magazines that keep students up to date as well as stretch their understanding of concepts and processes across the globe.  Geography Review, National Geographic and Topic Eye are a few examples.  In addition we have a large amount of resources and additional reading within the department that students are encouraged to use in their studies through the use of a regular reading log.  A subscription to the Philip Allan online archive allows students to access a huge online archive of information from home.  The online archive is not just related to Geography; students can also access publications relating to Sociology, Economics and Politics, all of which cover content that overlaps with Geography and thus allows students to develop a wider understanding of those areas.

The Duke of Edinburgh open Gold Award is available to students in Year 12 and 13 and can be completed partly during their enrichment time in the Sixth Form.  Participants must have at least experience to Bronze level or equivalent to register.  Although similar to Bronze and Silver, to achieve Gold students must complete more demanding tasks and the sections of volunteering, physical activity, and skills are carried out for longer periods of time (12-18 months).  The students must also complete an expedition which involves three days walking and two overnight camps for Silver and four days with three overnight camps for Gold.  Students need to plan and prepare for the expeditions, for which they need to be self-sufficient.  In addition to the expedition section, those students opting to do the Gold Award will need to compete a five day/four nights residential.  Students can develop their knowledge and understanding of map skills and navigation as well as a better understanding of the environment in which they complete their award.  The Duke of Edinburgh Award is very prestigious and widely cited as the number one preferred extra-curricular activity to be listed on students’ university applications.  It develops five main life skills which both employers and higher education institutions hope their applicants will have: self-management and motivation; problem-solving skills; team-working capabilities; a positive approach to work; and strong communication skills.